Tag Archives: resurrection

The Becoming Resurrection: A Chris Kraus Intervention

23 Jun

The Becoming Resurrection: A Chris Kraus Intervention

Date: Saturday, July 10, 2010
Time: 8:30pm – 11:30pm
Location: Beaubourg 268
City/Town: San Francisco, CA 94132

“[T]he more false starts one has, the better off you’re going to be.
Young artists should test themselves again and again . . .
A string of failures is probably the best way to get where you’re going.”

-Dennis Adams

Description

Beaubourg 268 brings you a night of uber-feminism, anti-feminism, in-différance and perhaps the highest aesthetic examples of Hegelian Aufhebung. Join Chris Kraus and friends for a discussion of the art world, her writing career, and her new art book “Where Art Belongs” that will be out in Feb 2011.

In the stifling antechamber that was the 90s, Chris Kraus wrote her debut Text about the “risk of failure” and “the inability of practice of any kind.” Five years after Dick Hebdige’s arrival to CalArts, in the wake of the reshaping of the General Education curriculum, Kraus published her first novel I Love Dick (Semiotexte 1997). Inspired by an evening she had spent with the English academic rock star, Kraus’ intervention had captured – in a kind of “downward synthesis” – the shattering importance of the two bodies converging due to, in part, the shared belief in the creative, emancipatory potential of failure.

Chris Kraus’ exegesis is a reversal of Otto Weininger’s thesis that ‘Woman Doesn’t Exist.’ Like with Sex and Character, the thing that strikes many readers about I Love Dick is its indifference to “Différance”. I Love Dick can indeed be read as a deconstructive proof that meaning is forever “deferred” or postponed through an endless chain of signifiers; nonetheless, Chris Kraus’ epistolary novel additionally begs to be read as a messianic breakout; an act, a cut, a one-time Event to redeem the core of Chris[x]ianity by abandoning its institutional shell.

Woman Does Exist, or more precisely – A Woman Exists: Christ Cross. As the poet Eileen Myles reformulates it: “(I keep typing Christ. Is Chris our girl on the cross?)” It is from this serendipitous theological proposal that Beaubourg 268 would like to present the works of emerging artists Tracy Molis, Cameron Adair, Robert Hansen and Aaron Spafford. For what dies on the cross/Kraus is not simply the sexist phantasmatic support of dumb ideology (Weininger: ‘Woman is only and thoroughly sexual’), but the superego Big Other/Big Dick/the injunction to Experiment! that haunts and betrays today’s art schools.

So that what is left is the holy spirit, or less hyperbolically: “Another Space which can no longer be dismissed as a fantasmatic supplement to social reality.”

The Becoming Resurrection: A Chris Kraus Intervention
Saturday, July 10, 2010, 8:30 – 11:30 pm

DERRIDEAN DECONSTRUCTION WITHOUT DERRIDA

30 Apr

DERRIDEAN DECONSTRUCTION WITHOUT DERRIDA

Date: Thursday, April 29, 2010
Time: 5:00pm – 6:00pm
Location: Beaubourg268, San Francisco

Description

On April 1993 Jacques Derrida delivered a lecture titled Specters of Marx at an academic symposium sponsored by the University of California at Riverside on the topic “Whither Marxism?” Since then a slew of critics and commentators, from Aijaz Ahmad to Terry Eagleton to Richard Rorty (to name only a few), have reproached the Sephardic-Jewish Algerian Marxist for the effective indifference and utter contentlessness of his post 1989 approach to a Marxism without Marxism, which is to say a Marxism deprived of its malevolent historical content. Upon re-reading Derrida’s Specters of Marx in today’s post 2008 Credit Collapse, post 9/11 political landscape, one can’t help but agreeing with the anti-derrideans of the 90s; not only has Derrida passed away, his theoretical specter too seems impotent – without substantial force or relevance in the short twenty first century.

But is there then a way to save Derrida without Derrida? which is to say a derridean deconstruction that doesn’t defer to the specter of a purely imaginary “New International”, one “without status, without title, and without name . . . without party, without country, without national community”? More pointedly: what would a positive hauntological manifestation that didn’t rely on Derrida’s empty, formalistic messianism, look like? How would an institution that embraced the specter of an effective utopia function?

This is the first of three talks that will make up a 150 page text on The Becoming Resurrection.

This event is free but capacity is limited.